Through the act of photography, I often find myself wandering the city in search for something new and intriguing to document -I wander in search for beauty. However, throughout this project – the beauty has found me. ‘Unearthed Urban Traces’ is a project that consists of banal, urban traces that have drawn me in through their psychogeographical pull whilst I dérive. These traces are evidence of life, decorating the urban landscape with history and untold, anonymous narratives.

Initially, this project intended on documenting ‘Uncommon Ground and Encounters’, however; the more photographs I took, the more I found myself being drawn to the traces of life within the city. I was captivated by the ‘dull’, hidden traces that I encountered once I had stopped physically searching for subjects to document. The intrigue and diversity of these minimal signs emphasised their natural curiosity and upon closer inspection, their rich history became empowering to be in the presence of. I was visually influenced Keith Arnatt and Sophie Ristelhueber because of their enigmatic, raw depiction of the traces they photograph.
For my final resolution, I decided to produce a book, seeing as I wanted to physically recreate the traces I encountered in a way that would immortalise them. I have already done this to an extent by using 35mm colour film as a medium - after studying William Eggleston’s work - however; within the book, the traces will be visualised in their most authentic manner, unlike the inverted depiction on a negative. My first book layout consisted of a heavy, chaotic flow of images with no blank pages as an attempt to replicate the chaos of the city, but, after producing a mock book, it became evident that this was not the best way to present this project. Instead, I settled for four different sizes and packed blank pages within my book as a way to symbolise all of the space, around these microcosmic traces, that is typically the main focus, ironically flipping the ‘typical’ perspective of urban intrigue and beauty, exploring Merlin Coverley’s interpretation of psychogeography and the desire to apprehend the city through fresh eyes whilst searching for hidden beauty.

Through this project, my perspective of urban beauty has been reconsidered, yet, now I wonder…What is left to be unearthed in the urban if all is considered beautiful?





Through the act of photography, I often find myself wandering the city in search for something new and intriguing to document -I wander in search for beauty. However, throughout this project – the beauty has found me. ‘Unearthed Urban Traces’ is a project that consists of banal, urban traces that have drawn me in through their psychogeographical pull whilst I dérive. These traces are evidence of life, decorating the urban landscape with history and untold, anonymous narratives.

Initially, this project intended on documenting ‘Uncommon Ground and Encounters’, however; the more photographs I took, the more I found myself being drawn to the traces of life within the city. I was captivated by the ‘dull’, hidden traces that I encountered once I had stopped physically searching for subjects to document. The intrigue and diversity of these minimal signs emphasised their natural curiosity and upon closer inspection, their rich history became empowering to be in the presence of. I was visually influenced Keith Arnatt and Sophie Ristelhueber because of their enigmatic, raw depiction of the traces they photograph.
For my final resolution, I decided to produce a book, seeing as I wanted to physically recreate the traces I encountered in a way that would immortalise them. I have already done this to an extent by using 35mm colour film as a medium - after studying William Eggleston’s work - however; within the book, the traces will be visualised in their most authentic manner, unlike the inverted depiction on a negative. My first book layout consisted of a heavy, chaotic flow of images with no blank pages as an attempt to replicate the chaos of the city, but, after producing a mock book, it became evident that this was not the best way to present this project. Instead, I settled for four different sizes and packed blank pages within my book as a way to symbolise all of the space, around these microcosmic traces, that is typically the main focus, ironically flipping the ‘typical’ perspective of urban intrigue and beauty, exploring Merlin Coverley’s interpretation of psychogeography and the desire to apprehend the city through fresh eyes whilst searching for hidden beauty.

Through this project, my perspective of urban beauty has been reconsidered, yet, now I wonder…What is left to be unearthed in the urban if all is considered beautiful?