Throughout this body of work (‘Somebody Shot the Swans’), I am exploring how I externally project myself within an urban landscape through the medium of photography, as well as sound. My photographs are influenced by Descartes’ understanding of the self and are taken through a psychogeographical approach, exposing the consciousness of my wandering mind and depicting the urban landscape from a flaneur’s perspective. Within this series, I attempt to detach myself from the physical vessel that is my body and allow my mind to roam freely, documenting any space or object that presents itself in a meditative, healing manner. The spaces documented also act as external manifestations of my ‘self’ because my subconscious felt such an innate connection with them, as though we were the same entity compelled by each other but separated by our mediums. This allows for an untraditional approach to autobiographical photography.

The video format and use of sound allows the audience to experience the city through a short series of derives with a pace and atmosphere that has been pre-determined through my interactions with the spaces, forcing the audience to encounter the city through my sense of ‘self’.
This work sits comfortably in multiple genres of contemporary photography, particularly the genres of landscape and autobiography. Although my work doesn’t find itself restrained to the typical visual attributes of autobiography, it does find itself approving of key theoretical concepts and historical readings into self-representation. I believe that my photography is exploring core genres in a fresh, contemporary manner because of the way that I dissect vital attributes of traditional genres and merge an array of components from such genres in order to create a new, explorative and intuitive body of work.






Throughout this body of work (‘Somebody Shot the Swans’), I am exploring how I externally project myself within an urban landscape through the medium of photography, as well as sound. My photographs are influenced by Descartes’ understanding of the self and are taken through a psychogeographical approach, exposing the consciousness of my wandering mind and depicting the urban landscape from a flaneur’s perspective. Within this series, I attempt to detach myself from the physical vessel that is my body and allow my mind to roam freely, documenting any space or object that presents itself in a meditative, healing manner. The spaces documented also act as external manifestations of my ‘self’ because my subconscious felt such an innate connection with them, as though we were the same entity compelled by each other but separated by our mediums. This allows for an untraditional approach to autobiographical photography.

The video format and use of sound allows the audience to experience the city through a short series of derives with a pace and atmosphere that has been pre-determined through my interactions with the spaces, forcing the audience to encounter the city through my sense of ‘self’.
This work sits comfortably in multiple genres of contemporary photography, particularly the genres of landscape and autobiography. Although my work doesn’t find itself restrained to the typical visual attributes of autobiography, it does find itself approving of key theoretical concepts and historical readings into self-representation. I believe that my photography is exploring core genres in a fresh, contemporary manner because of the way that I dissect vital attributes of traditional genres and merge an array of components from such genres in order to create a new, explorative and intuitive body of work.