‘Rupture’ is a photographic exploration of how personal trauma and memory embody themselves within landscapes, objects, and buildings. This work takes psychological and physical trauma on the human body and translates them into external beings as a method of phototherapy, a visualisation of the conflict within. This series focuses on notions of stability and recovery, exploring constructs of home and ‘place’ and how these ideals have been ruptured through trauma.

This project was initially concerned with collective and personal trauma, however, after reading in to Lucy Lippard and Tacita Dean, it became evident that I was subconsciously drawn to ‘places’ rather and how personal trauma manifests within them; this further expanded in to structures and objects through visual research in to Paul Graham, Geert Goiris, Miyako Ishiuchi, and Donovan Wylie.

Theoretical writings by Joan Gibbons, Liz Wells, Margaret Iverson, and Anthony Hudek confirmed that my fascination with documenting objects and traces of this genre was because they are indexical signifiers of trauma and memory. When this concept was realised, I was able to invoke these notions further in my photographic practice through the punctum of the image.
As well as this, working with analogue formats allowed me to embrace indexicality and experiment with techniques that allowed me to produce unique, haunting imagery. Further research in to Alison Blunt and Adrian Wilson allowed me to comprehend the importance of the ‘stability of home’ and how to recover it once it has been ruptured by trauma - finalising this project’s concept.

My final resolution consists of ten photographs, that extrude notions of home, trauma, memory, and recovery, and is assisted by text that explores my personal trauma. The layout of this body of work is erratic and fragmented, emphasising the constant battle to return to a state of solidity. My work is autobiographical, however; it addresses the viewer with my experience with trauma, without putting myself in frame, playfully teetering on the restrictions and boundaries of the autobiographical term.

In the near future, this series will extended in to the format of a book to further explore and celebrate the photographs that contributed towards this project but did not make the final edit.







‘Rupture’ is a photographic exploration of how personal trauma and memory embody themselves within landscapes, objects, and buildings. This work takes psychological and physical trauma on the human body and translates them into external beings as a method of phototherapy, a visualisation of the conflict within. This series focuses on notions of stability and recovery, exploring constructs of home and ‘place’ and how these ideals have been ruptured through trauma.

This project was initially concerned with collective and personal trauma, however, after reading in to Lucy Lippard and Tacita Dean, it became evident that I was subconsciously drawn to ‘places’ rather and how personal trauma manifests within them; this further expanded in to structures and objects through visual research in to Paul Graham, Geert Goiris, Miyako Ishiuchi, and Donovan Wylie.

Theoretical writings by Joan Gibbons, Liz Wells, Margaret Iverson, and Anthony Hudek confirmed that my fascination with documenting objects and traces of this genre was because they are indexical signifiers of trauma and memory. When this concept was realised, I was able to invoke these notions further in my photographic practice through the punctum of the image.
As well as this, working with analogue formats allowed me to embrace indexicality and experiment with techniques that allowed me to produce unique, haunting imagery. Further research in to Alison Blunt and Adrian Wilson allowed me to comprehend the importance of the ‘stability of home’ and how to recover it once it has been ruptured by trauma - finalising this project’s concept.

My final resolution consists of ten photographs, that extrude notions of home, trauma, memory, and recovery, and is assisted by text that explores my personal trauma. The layout of this body of work is erratic and fragmented, emphasising the constant battle to return to a state of solidity. My work is autobiographical, however; it addresses the viewer with my experience with trauma, without putting myself in frame, playfully teetering on the restrictions and boundaries of the autobiographical term.

In the near future, this series will extended in to the format of a book to further explore and celebrate the photographs that contributed towards this project but did not make the final edit.